Developing Resiliency

Portland Maine

The Waves Came Crashing Full by Charlie Widdis

It’s hard to believe it’s been a week since I last wrote here. Time flies when you’re feeling good, and I’m feeling great! I didn’t think I could ever feel “young” again.  I not only feel younger than a did four weeks ago,  I feel better than I ever have in a body/mind/spirit. It’s been a hard-fought battle and I don’t pretend that there won’t be ups and downs, although wouldn’t it be great if there weren’t?

When we feel great, we always want to feel great. When we feel lousy, we think we’ll never feel good again. I continue to work on accepting the ebb and flow of life, in all its dimensions; to join forces with the rhythm of my body, my mind and my spirit as I live out my life; to pay attention to the signals each is sending me and to do what I can to cooperate with these signals, and to respond to their needs. My goal is to develop a resiliency that I have heretofore not had the good fortune to possess.

Rather than blocking  or ignoring the signals that are attempting to make themselves known to us, perhaps because they seem inconvenient or we fear what they might be trying to tell us, we might choose instead to turn toward them and to learn to trust that they are with us rather than against us. Our body is a gift, a friend, a beloved companion. It knows what we need.

It’s the little things that we do to tend and care for ourselves that fosters resiliency;  stopping often enough, and long enough to listen to what we know; to silence our minds and hear with our other senses. Most of us have lived in mental overdrive for so long, and the world around us is so very loud,  that it does indeed take a concerted effort to tune in to our bodies and to the voice of our spirit guide.

There are numerous ways to develop a practice of tuning in and each is as unique as the individual. An important first step of my healing journey was reconnecting with my body. PTSD, and trauma of any kind, can leave one feeling “outside” oneself, in a bubble, or a box.  I felt numb, detached, disconnected; I had no feelings, no sense of taste or smell, no appetites of any kind; I was unaware that my feet were even touching the floor when I sat. One of the first practices my healing guide suggested was the practice of mindfulness, tuning in to the sensations of my hands on the arm of a chair, my fingers as they gripped the arm’s edge, my feet where they connected with the ground beneath them. It was a slow process, but bit by bit, I began to let sensations back in. Eventually, I moved on to healing massage and chiropractic treatments. I was knotted, frozen, locked up from trauma.

It’s often not just a single traumatic incident that leads us into a state of numbness, but rather layers upon layers of traumas of all sizes, each compounding the one before. When we do not have resiliency, we reach a point where we can no longer ride the waves. That is why so many of us reach our breaking point at mid-life. We have held up the mountain we carried for as long as we could. It’s time to put it down.

Dorothy Sander 2014

A Word About Trauma

Along the Healing Path 

 

 

 

About Dorothy Sander

Writer.

10 Comments

  1. For me, slowing my pace has been extremely important. No more rushing around with my head spinning. No more doing twelve things as one time. Yes, I still resist at times, but over time it happens less frequently.

  2. Your thoughts are better than a therapy session. Let me correct that: They often ARE the equivalent of a therapy session. Lines that resonated with me today: “When we feel great, we always want to feel great. When we feel lousy, we think we’ll never feel good again. I continue to work on accepting the ebb and flow of life . . . .” I believe that’s a life-long process. I hope I’m getting better at it!

    • You always make me smile, Marian. They’re certainly cheaper than therapy! 🙂 and, I agree it’s a life long process and I have no doubt you ARE getting better at it! We have the advantage of years of practice!

  3. Pingback: Developing Resiliency | Manifest Me 2014 | Loss, Grief, Transitions and Relationship Support

  4. Thank you, Dorothy. Once again, you have presented something I need to hear & put into practice. Right now. You are a blessing!

  5. Hi Dorothy. Thank your for visiting my blog http://www.FindYourMiddleGround.com
    I’m so glad you did, as I get to connect with yours and enjoy your wisdom!
    I love how you’ve linked resiliency with being fully present and connected with our mind body and spirit.
    Yes indeed 🙂
    When we find our Middle Ground it becomes becomes a place of resilience building as well as inspiration, nurturing, peace, creativity and inspiration.
    Val x

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